The Street by Street project team is here to help support people to connect with their neighbours by providing free resources – ideas, examples, tools, encouragement and support, via this site and over the phone.

What happens when neighbours connect?

As neighbours get to know one another through simple, regular social gatherings, they find common interests and concerns. People help one another, friendships may form, kids find playmates, matters affecting the area are shared and the group may take on projects of interest to members. We use a community development approach, where we give lots of ideas and encourage each neighbour group to choose for themselves what they want to do.

Who makes this happen?

We call the people who initiate and take organising roles Community Connectors. Anyone with an interest in turning their streets into a community can do this. While one person may initiate, we encourage that person to find one or two neighbours to share the connecting role. Services and government can support the project by helping us find more Community Connectors and in other ways.

What do Community Connectors do?

If you were a Connector, you would decide what area you will include and letter drop an invitation to your neighbours (you can use our sample) to a simple social gathering at a café, park or other venue. It’s as simple as that. You’ll meet some wonderful people who will be keen to continue and you’ll discover some common interests (related to where you live or not).

What support do we give our Community Connectors?

We’ll talk with you and give you advice and support along the way. Under Getting Started you will find our Street by Street Project Information Kit, Community Connector Kit, Community Partner Kit for agencies and under Resources and Inspiration you’ll find a sample of inspiring community groups, ideas for neighbour groups, links to great resources and sample invitations and other tools you can use.

What is the nature of a Street by Street group?

Street by Street groups are welcoming, informal, inclusive, fun and independent. They are for neighbours that live close to each other, perhaps one long street or a handful of streets, not an entire suburb. Regular social activities are central for a sense of community to develop. All other activities are optional. Participants are not volunteers, they are people in an informal relationship with their neighbours, as neighbours.

 

I’m a community member:

I’m part of a community group:

I’m part of a formal organisation: